From the Editor's Desk: A reminder to keep CES announcements in context

From the Editor's Desk: A reminder to keep CES announcements in context

0 19

It’s good to remember that just because something is newsworthy doesn’t mean it’s going to be a real-world product.
Amazingly, CES 2018 is less than a week away. Though the “show” doesn’t officially open until January 9, the press will be heading to Las Vegas this week and the news will start pouring out this coming weekend before CES has technically started. Heck, you’re going to start seeing CES announcements in the first couple days of January, a full week early.
With all of that CES craziness so nearly upon us, it’s worth remembering what this show is actually for and what it really means when it comes to products actually being released.

As someone who follows the technology world closely, it’s easy to get excited about the flood of big and exciting announcements coming out of CES. There will be dozens of previously unknown companies showing off some pretty amazing technology demos and even complete products. Even if you ignore the companies that make absolutely unattainable claims, of which there are many, there will still be plenty of realistic and believable stuff to see and get excited about.
Unfortunately, most of it will never come to market for you and I to buy. And understanding why requires understanding what and who CES is for.
There’s a reason why it’s now called just “CES” and that is no longer an acronym for “Consumer Electronics Show” — this isn’t really a show aimed at consumers, even though many of the products on display are consumer-focused in nature. No the reality of CES is that it’s designed for businesses to talk to other businesses all in one place. For companies to talk about licensing or buying technologies (or the company altogether), or to get some investment, or to strike some deals for distribution or manufacturing or a

Article originally published at: Android Central